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CALL FOR APPLICATIONS: GLOBAL STUDIES PROGRAMME

The application deadline for the GSP class of 2019 is the 30th of November 2018 (date of receipt). The Global Studies Programme, initiated in 2001, is a two-year master’s degree programme. The main objective of the programme is to study various cultures and regions within the social sciences, focusing on the Global South. The Global Studies Programme is conducted jointly by the University of Freiburg (Germany), the University of Cape Town (South Africa), Jawaharlal Nehru University (New Delhi, India), FLACSO Argentina (Buenos Aires) and Chulalongkorn University (Bangkok).

 

Within the GSP students learn to approach the world and globalization from various regional perspectives and disciplines, comprising sociology, political sciences, anthropology and cultural geography. The programme’s global and multicultural experience is enhanced by the diversity of its students who study at different places around the world together. Each group comprises students from all parts of the world.

The programme received many high-ranking awards including the BMW Group Award for Intercultural Learning (2004) and the Top Ten International Master’s Programme title by the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) and the Stifterverband für die Deutsche Wissenschaft (2006). In 2011 these successes were confirmed again with the reaccreditation of the GSP in Germany. Since 2001, more than two hundred eighty students from over sixty countries on all the continents have participated in the programme.
From mid-April the programme begins every year with the summer semester in Freiburg. In their second semester, students can choose between FLACSO Argentina in Buenos Aires (Argentina) or Cape Town University (South Africa), while for their third semester students have the choice between Jawaharlal Nehru University in New Delhi (India) or Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok (Thailand). In the fourth semester, students return to Freiburg for their MA thesis and final examination.


The application deadline for the GSP class of 2019 is the 30th of November 2018 (date of receipt).
The Programme Director of the Global Studies Programme is Dr. Caroline Janz.
For further information on the programme and the application requirements please check the GSP-website www.global-studies.com or send an email to info@global-studies.com.

10 years GSP at FLACSO, Argentina

Within the framework of the celebration for its 10 years in FLACSO Argentina, the Global Studies Program invites a series of conferences that intends to discuss the very ideas of globalization and deglobalization, its rhythms and trends, as well as to inquire on the basis of communication, symbolism and materials that in an increasingly post-liberal framework and in a context of "post-truth" can make possible reciprocity and global coexistence, and in this sense, review the contribution that emerging countries and the Global South can make.

The conference will be in charge of leading international academics.

Riccardo Petrella
Professor Emeritus of the Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium
"The three pillars for the construction of a new planetary common home"
September, 17th - 6 p.m. (presentation in English)

Fernando Calderón
Director of the Innovation, Development and Multiculturalism Program of the National University of San Martín (UNSAM)
"Modernity as an intercultural network. Uncertainty and new challenges in a global Latin America"
October 9th - 6 p.m. (presentation in Spanish)

Ulrich Brand
University of Vienna, Austria
"How capitalism affirms its hegemony: The imperial mode of living and implications for Latin America"
November 16th - 6 p.m. (presentation in English)

The three meetings will be held at FLACSO Argentina, located in Tucumán 1966, Buenos Aires.
Reports and registration: jornadasgsp2018@flacso.org.ar

For more information please visit http://flacso.org.ar/noticias/diez-anos-del-gsp-en-flacso-argentina/ (Spanish).

Guest lecture of Prof. Dr. Alejandro Pelfini on "Transformability of Elites in Emerging Societies. The case of business elites in Chile".

We're happy to announce the guest lecture of Prof. Alejandro Pelfini (head of the Global Studies Programme at FLACSO, Argentina and professor at Universidad del Salvador, Buenos Aires) on "Transformability of Elites in Emerging Societies. The case of business elites in Chile" on Wednesday, 11th of July 20018 from 6-8 pm (room 1016, KG I).

Guest Lecture: Chandni Basu - The Dialectics of Childhood and Deviance

We are very pleased to announce that Mrs. Chandni Basu will give a guest lecture on June 18th: "The Dialectics of Childhood and Deviance: young people´s sexual interaction and marriage within the Indian context - a critique of Global Childhoods". The lecture starts at 02:00 PM in room 1139, KG I (Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg).

Guest Lecture: Prof. Walter Mignolo - "Latin" America in the Past and Current World (Dis) Order: Pueblos Originarios, European Diaspora and African Forced Migrations

We are very pleased to announce that Prof. Walter Mignolo will give a guest lecture on May 28th: "Latin' America in the Past and Current World (Dis) Order: Pueblos Originarios, European Diaspora and African Forced Migrations". The lecture starts at 08:15 PM in HS 1098, KG I (Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg). This event is part of the lecture series held in cooperation with the Arnold-Bergsträsser-Institut on "Latin America between Crises and New Opportunities: Social Movements, State and Democracy".

Workshop with Professor Walter Mignolo (Duke University): What is Decoloniality?

Background reading available: https://www.dukeupress.edu/Assets/PubMaterials/978-0-8223-7109-0_601.pdf
When: Tuesday, May 29th from 12-2 pm
Where: Institut für Soziologie, Übungsraum 1 - KG IV

Guest Lecture on "Cross-Cultural Marriages" by Dr. Renuka Singh (JNU, India)

We are very happ to annouce that Dr. Renuka Singh (JNU, India) will hold a guest lecture on "Cross-Cultural Marriages" on 30th of May 2018 in Freiburg. The lecture will be held from 10.00 AM to 11.30 AM in HS 3411, KGIII (Albert-Ludwigs-Universität).

Lecture Series: "Latin America's New Moment of Contested Politics: Social Movements, the State, and Democracy"

The Arnold-Bergstraesser Institute (ABI) and Global Studies Programme present a Politicum Lecture Series on Latin America's New Moment of Contested Politics: Social Movements, the State, and Democracy

New cleavages and opportunities define the complex political landscape of Latin America in 2018: In Mexico, presidential elections will take place in a climate of distrust, where many accuse political institutions of collusions with crime. In Venezuela, the news suggest a polarization becoming more acute by the week, and political and economic turbulence coincide. Colombian society, while having ended a 60 years armed conflict between the state and the FARC Guerrilla at least on paper, and having destroyed large numbers of weapons, is now pitted between two presidential candidates with very different ideas of peace. What does the altered political panorama mean for Social Movements in Latin America? In which ways does this change their relation with the state? What democratic potential lies in political challenges? Which problems arise for the democratic negotiation of conflict?

The series aims to provide perspectives on the current political challenges in Latin America and their impacts on political actors, institutions and mechanisms.

The series will be held in English. Mondays, 8 pm.

For Detailed Information please check https://www.studiumgenerale.uni-freiburg.de/col-politicum/vortragsreihen/lateinamerika.

 

 

SOCARE Congress: “Rethinking Europe from the Carib bean: Entanglements and Legacies” 12-15 April, 2018 Albert-Ludwigs-University of Freiburg, Germany

From 12-15 April 2018 Albert-Ludwigs-University of Freiburg has the pleasure to host the 16th SOCARE Congress on “Rethinking Europe from the Carib bean: Entanglements and Legacies”.

Programme and further information on http://caribbeanresearch.net/en/2018-conference/

The multiple ties that bind the Caribbean and Europe are the main focus of the conference marking 30 years since the Society for Caribbean Research (Socare) was founded. The Caribbean was the first region to be colonized by European powers in the 16th century and the last one to be (incompletely) decolonized in the 20th century. It received more than one-third of all Africans trafficked in the European trade in enslaved people between the 16th and 19th centuries as well as significant numbers of indentured and contracted European laborers during much of the same period, followed by indentureship and contract labor from Asia. It experienced the genocide of thousands of indigenous groups at the hands of European colonists as well as some of the most intense economic exploitation among Europe’s colonies. After World War II, European states compensated for their domestic labor shortages by recruiting large numbers of workers from their Caribbean colonies. This also prompted changes in the citizenship policies that European colonial powers directed at these migrants.

Today, more than one-third of Europe’s remaining colonial possessions are located in the Caribbean, and the CARICOM Reparations Commission, established in 2013, states that it “finds European colonial rule as a persistent part of Caribbean life.”[1] Nevertheless, historiography, geography, as well as social, literary, and cultural theories tend to conceive of Europe and the Caribbean as separate, even antithetical regions. For social sciences focused on modern industrial societies, the Caribbean’s legacy of enslavement made it appear as paradigmatically backward, inefficient, and underdeveloped. As such, it constituted the opposite of the notion of the free, modern, and efficient wage-work which Europe claimed to have pioneered. Having been shaped by an influx of African, European and Asian populations, the Caribbean has come to represent racial and ethnic diversity par excellence, as also evidenced in Caribbean thinkers’ theorizations of transculturation, hybridity, and creolization. In contrast, Europe – following centuries of mass emigration, nation-building processes, expulsions, and waves of ethnic cleansing – stood for high levels of ethnic homogenization. The reversal of the migration pattern since the mid-20th century in the direction of Europe, among other regions, triggered large-scale debates on race on the continent and increasingly framed immigration as a threat to European societies. In the context of literary studies, the canonical status of European ‘national’ literatures still tends to be juxtaposed to ‘postcolonial’ Caribbean literary production. Notions of postcoloniality similarly focus mainly on the former colonies, while only recently debates across Europe have begun to address the question of Europe’s postcoloniality.

In the wake of the humanitarian crises following the most recent hurricanes and earthquakes in the Greater Caribbean, limited and discrepant disaster relief efforts have again raised questions about political and economic relations between Western powers and the Caribbean. Facing public health disasters and waves of out-migration, island economies are further challenged through current citizenship regimes, fragmented political accountability and exploitative economic arrangements, which highlight the ambivalent geopolitical status of many Caribbean territories vis-à-vis European and U.S.-American interests.

Against the backdrop of these and related aspects, the conference focuses on the legacies and continuities of European colonialism in the region and on transregional entanglements between the Caribbean and Europe. Examining languages, (post)colonial histories, socioeconomic trajectories, and aesthetic practices in the Caribbean in their relations to Europe also provides a basis for rethinking Europe from the Caribbean. The conference aims to challenge the hypervisibility of Western Europe by highlighting Caribbean entanglements with othered and racialized Southern and Eastern Europes, as well as through the frequently ‘forgotten Europes’ still claimed as overseas territories and regions in the Greater Caribbean. What can Caribbean perspectives contribute to a different and more nuanced understanding of Europe(s) today?

We invite contributions from different research fields including, but not limited to, literary and cultural studies, sociology, anthropology, linguistics, philosophy, history, geography, and political science. Inter- and transdisciplinary perspectives are particularly welcome, as are poster presentations of PhD projects. We welcome contributions in English, French or Spanish and encourage handouts or presentation material in one of the languages other than that of the oral presentation. Possible topics include:

 

  • The Caribbean as a laboratory of European modernity

 

  • The political economy of race and racialization of the Caribbean in Europe

 

  • Migration flows linking Europe and the Caribbean

 

  • Coloniality, incomplete decolonization, and European Caribbean territories today

 

  • Capitalism and non-wage labor in Europe and the Caribbean: enslavement, second serfdom, indentureship, apprenticeship

 

  • European economic interests in today’s Caribbean: e.g., resort tourism, tax havens, land ownership and free-trade zones

 

  • European and Commonwealth citizenships in the Caribbean as well as Caribbean citizenships in Europe

 

  • Climate change, humanitarian crises, and disaster relief in the context of geopolitical ambivalence and fragmented sovereignties in the Caribbean

 

  • The Caribbean in European politics of memory: e.g., native genocide, enslavement, CARICOM’s call for reparations from European countries

 

  • Rethinking Europe(s) through Caribbean notions of transculturation, hybridity, and creolization

 

  • Aesthetic entanglements between the Caribbean and Eastern or Southern Europe in literature, film, or visual arts

 

  • Linguistic practices, interrelations, and language policies

 


For further information contact: Manuela Boatcă: manuela.boatca@soziologie.uni-freiburg.de or Annika McPherson: annika.mcpherson@philhist.uni-augsburg.de

"Jettisoning old knowledge for new ". GSP at Uni Freibug's online magazine

The effects of globalization had long been making themselves felt when the Social Sciences’ Master’s Program was initiated at the University of Freiburg fifteen years ago. Its approach – sending students out into the world to explore societal change first-hand – was, however, genuinely new. After spending time at universities in South Africa, Argentina, Thailand or India, the students today above all bring back new perspectives to Freiburg. Now a series is to introduce seven further projects in international cooperation.

Prof. Manuela Boatcă and Prof. Anca Parvulescu awarded ACLS 2018 Collaborative Research Fellowship

ACLS is pleased to announce the 2018 Collaborative Research Fellows. The program, which is funded by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, supports small teams of scholars as they research and coauthor a major scholarly product. The eight teams selected by peer reviewers this year cross disciplinary, methodological, and geographic boundaries, and represent a range of institutions and academic ranks.

To find out more about Prof Manuela  Boatcă and Prof. Anca Parvulescu's research project follow: http://www.acls.org/research/fellow.aspx?cid=106fc6a3-fa05-e811-80d3-000c299476de

 

13.11.2017 Guest Lecture: Thinking through relations of belonging: Ambivalence, marginalization, and exclusion

 

Public Guest Lecture

 

"Thinking through relations of belonging:
Ambivalence, marginalization, and
exclusion"

 

Prof. Shelley Feldman
(Cornell University, USA)

 

 Monday, 13th November, 6:00 pm (c.t.)
Sociology Institute (Übungsraum I, KG IV, 5th floor)

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS: GLOBAL STUDIES PROGRAMME

The application deadline for the GSP class of 2018 is 30.11.2017 (date of receipt).

The Global Studies Programme, initiated in 2001, is a two-year master’s degree programme. The main objective of the programme is to study various cultures and regions within the social sciences, focusing on the Global South. The Global Studies Programme is conducted jointly by the University of Freiburg (Germany), the University of Cape Town (South Africa), Jawaharlal Nehru University (New Delhi, India), FLACSO Argentina (Buenos Aires) and Chulalongkorn University (Bangkok).

Within the GSP students learn to approach the world and globalization from various regional perspectives and disciplines, comprising sociology, political sciences, anthropology and cultural geography. The programme’s global and multicultural experience is enhanced by the diversity of its students who study at different places around the world together. Each group comprises students from all parts of the world.

The programme received many high-ranking awards including the BMW Group Award for Intercultural Learning (2004) and the Top Ten International Master’s Programme title by the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) and the Stifterverband für die Deutsche Wissenschaft (2006). In 2011 these successes were confirmed again with the reaccreditation of the GSP in Germany for five more years. Since 2001, more than two hundred eighty students from over sixty countries on all the continents have participated in the programme.

From mid-April the programme begins every year with the summer semester in Freiburg. In their second semester, students can choose between FLACSO Argentina in Buenos Aires (Argentina) or Cape Town University (South Africa), while for their third semester students have the choice between Jawaharlal Nehru University in New Delhi (India) or Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok (Thailand). In the fourth semester, students return to Freiburg for their MA thesis and final examination.

The application deadline for the GSP class of 2018 is 30.11.2017 (date of receipt).

The Programme Director of the Global Studies Programme is Caroline Janz.

For further information on the programme and the application requirements please check the GSP-website www.global-studies.com  or send an email to info@global-studies.com.

Call for Papers „Rethinking Europe from the Caribbean: Entanglements and Legacies“ 12-15 April, 2018 Albert-Ludwigs-University of Freiburg, Germany

The multiple ties that bind the Caribbean and Europe are the main focus of the conference marking 30 years since the Society for Caribbean Research (Socare) was founded. The Caribbean was the first region to be colonized by European powers in the 16th century and the last one to be (incompletely) decolonized in the 20th century. It received more than one-third of all Africans trafficked in the European trade in enslaved people between the 16th and 19th centuries as well as significant numbers of indentured and contracted European laborers during much of the same period, followed by indentureship and contract labor from Asia. It experienced the genocide of thousands of indigenous groups at the hands of European colonists as well as some of the most intense economic exploitation among Europe’s colonies. After World War II, European states compensated for their domestic labor shortages by recruiting large numbers of workers from their Caribbean colonies. This also prompted changes in the citizenship policies that European colonial powers directed at these migrants.

The multiple ties that bind the Caribbean and Europe are the main focus of the conference marking 30 years since the Society for Caribbean Research (Socare) was founded. The Caribbean was the first region to be colonized by European powers in the 16th century and the last one to be (incompletely) decolonized in the 20th century. It received more than one-third of all Africans trafficked in the European trade in enslaved people between the 16th and 19th centuries as well as significant numbers of indentured and contracted European laborers during much of the same period, followed by indentureship and contract labor from Asia. It experienced the genocide of thousands of indigenous groups at the hands of European colonists as well as some of the most intense economic exploitation among Europe’s colonies. After World War II, European states compensated for their domestic labor shortages by recruiting large numbers of workers from their Caribbean colonies. This also prompted changes in the citizenship policies that European colonial powers directed at these migrants.

Today, more than one-third of Europe’s remaining colonial possessions are located in the Caribbean, and the CARICOM Reparations Commission, established in 2013, states that it “finds European colonial rule as a persistent part of Caribbean life.”[1] Nevertheless, historiography, geography, as well as social, literary, and cultural theories tend to conceive of Europe and the Caribbean as separate, even antithetical regions. For social sciences focused on modern industrial societies, the Caribbean’s legacy of enslavement made it appear as paradigmatically backward, inefficient, and underdeveloped. As such, it constituted the opposite of the notion of the free, modern, and efficient wage-work which Europe claimed to have pioneered. Having been shaped by an influx of African, European and Asian populations, the Caribbean has come to represent racial and ethnic diversity par excellence, as also evidenced in Caribbean thinkers’ theorizations of transculturation, hybridity, and creolization. In contrast, Europe – following centuries of mass emigration, nation-building processes, expulsions, and waves of ethnic cleansing – stood for high levels of ethnic homogenization. The reversal of the migration pattern since the mid-20th century in the direction of Europe, among other regions, triggered large-scale debates on race on the continent and increasingly framed immigration as a threat to European societies. In the context of literary studies, the canonical status of European ‘national’ literatures still tends to be juxtaposed to ‘postcolonial’ Caribbean literary production. Notions of postcoloniality similarly focus mainly on the former colonies, while only recently debates across Europe have begun to address the question of Europe’s postcoloniality.

In the wake of the humanitarian crises following the most recent hurricanes and earthquakes in the Greater Caribbean, limited and discrepant disaster relief efforts have again raised questions about political and economic relations between Western powers and the Caribbean. Facing public health disasters and waves of out-migration, island economies are further challenged through current citizenship regimes, fragmented political accountability and exploitative economic arrangements, which highlight the ambivalent geopolitical status of many Caribbean territories vis-à-vis European and U.S.-American interests.

Against the backdrop of these and related aspects, the conference focuses on the legacies and continuities of European colonialism in the region and on transregional entanglements between the Caribbean and Europe. Examining languages, (post)colonial histories, socioeconomic trajectories, and aesthetic practices in the Caribbean in their relations to Europe also provides a basis for rethinking Europe from the Caribbean. The conference aims to challenge the hypervisibility of Western Europe by highlighting Caribbean entanglements with othered and racialized Southern and Eastern Europes, as well as through the frequently ‘forgotten Europes’ still claimed as overseas territories and regions in the Greater Caribbean. What can Caribbean perspectives contribute to a different and more nuanced understanding of Europe(s) today?

We invite contributions from different research fields including, but not limited to, literary and cultural studies, sociology, anthropology, linguistics, philosophy, history, geography, and political science. Inter- and transdisciplinary perspectives are particularly welcome, as are poster presentations of PhD projects. We welcome contributions in English, French or Spanish and encourage handouts or presentation material in one of the languages other than that of the oral presentation. Possible topics include:

 

  • The Caribbean as a laboratory of European modernity

 

  • The political economy of race and racialization of the Caribbean in Europe

 

  • Migration flows linking Europe and the Caribbean

 

  • Coloniality, incomplete decolonization, and European Caribbean territories today

 

  • Capitalism and non-wage labor in Europe and the Caribbean: enslavement, second serfdom, indentureship, apprenticeship

 

  • European economic interests in today’s Caribbean: e.g., resort tourism, tax havens, land ownership and free-trade zones

 

  • European and Commonwealth citizenships in the Caribbean as well as Caribbean citizenships in Europe

 

  • Climate change, humanitarian crises, and disaster relief in the context of geopolitical ambivalence and fragmented sovereignties in the Caribbean

 

  • The Caribbean in European politics of memory: e.g., native genocide, enslavement, CARICOM’s call for reparations from European countries

 

  • Rethinking Europe(s) through Caribbean notions of transculturation, hybridity, and creolization

 

  • Aesthetic entanglements between the Caribbean and Eastern or Southern Europe in literature, film, or visual arts

 

  • Linguistic practices, interrelations, and language policies

 

Proposals for papers or posters (please state your choice) should include the author’s name and affiliation, presentation title, an abstract of around 300 words, as well as a short paragraph with biographical information.

 

Please submit proposals via e-mail to both conveners by 15 November 2017

 

Manuela Boatcă: manuela.boatca@soziologie.uni-freiburg.de Annika McPherson: annika.mcpherson@philhist.uni-augsburg.de

Prof. Dr. Manuela Boatcă awarded "Sociologist of the Month" by Current Sociology

Prof. Dr. Manuela Boatcă awarded "Sociologist of the Month" by Current Sociology

Prof. Dr. Manuela Boatcă

September 1, 2017

Head of Global Studies Programme, Prof. Dr. Manuela Boatcă is awarded "Sociologist of the Month" by Current Sociology, one of the oldest sociology journals in the world. Current Sociology is a fully peer-reviewed, international journal that publishes original research and innovative critical commentary both on current debates within sociology as a developing discipline, and the contribution that sociologists can make to modern societies in a globalizing world.

From the Current Sociology Facebook Page: 

Meet Manuela Boatcă, our #SociologistOfTheMonth for September. She is a Professor of Sociology at the Institut für Soziologie of the Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg, Germany, Head of School of the Global Studies Programme, and President of ISA's RC 56 (Historical Sociology). Here she tells us how she came to the field of sociology:

“I grew up in a white middle-class Romanian household during the last decade of Ceaușescu’s reign. My parents, who had come to Bucharest from rural parts of Moldavia to study, were teachers of Romanian literature and lovers of grammar and history who had had little to no opportunity to travel abroad. I got a degree in English and German languages and literatures in Bucharest at a time when the curriculum was being completely overhauled – we were the first generation to be allowed to read Orwell’s 1984 and Nabokov’s Lolita, which had been banned before 1989. But we were also the first generation of students who had a realistic chance of traveling to the countries whose languages and literatures we were studying, something that most of our professors, just like my parents, had never been able to do. After getting my degree, I therefore went to Germany to study sociology in order to get a better sense of what the “socio” in “sociolinguistics” that we had been taught as part of the study of languages was all about. It was not before I had obtained a PhD in sociology four years later that I acknowledged that I was a migrant and was in Germany to stay. I acquired increasing awareness of my lesser Europeanness in a Western European environment through the difficulties that the spelling of my last name posed to everyone outside of my country of birth and the uneasiness that my Romanian passport occasioned border authorities and myself. A research stay in the United States shortly before 9/11 made me acquainted with dependency theory, world-systems analysis and the modernity/coloniality perspective. Together, these approaches provided me with an analytical framework into which peripheral experiences and structural dependencies at the global level made perfect sense, as did their marginalisation in mainstream social theory. I therefore became interested in how imperial and colonial power relations affect present-day opportunities for global mobility, structure inequalities worldwide, and impact citizenships.”

Guest Lecture: 21st June 2017

4pm, KG 1, HS 1119

Dr. Wiebke Keim from SAGE (Sociétés, Acteurs, Gouvernement en Europe - University of Strasbourg) will hold a lecture of the title "Global Knowledge Production and Circulation“. 

Announcement: No study fee increase for GSP students

All students of the Global Studies Programme are excluded from the recently introduced increase in university fees (for non-EU students) in South-Western Germany.

Guest Lecture: 17.05.2017

18-20h, Media room, 5th floor, KG IV

From Knowledge to Informational Basis: Capability, Capacity to Aspire and Research

Vando Borghi, University of Bologna, Italy

Abstract

This lecture explores the way the process of transformation of knowledge into an ‘informational

basis’ (of policies and of public choice) represents a good terrain for building an effective exchange

and collaboration between the capability approach and other efforts, in the social sciences, to

emphasize the crucial role of agency, actors’ critical capacities and voice. Beyond the rhetorical

image of our self-claimed ‘knowledge societies’, the analysis of the contemporary characteristics

of the relationship between knowledge and an informational basis leads us to reconceive research

in terms of a human right to actively participate in the knowledge-making process, enabling

citizens’ capacity for voice to intervene in the construction of the informational bases of the

collective decision. Starting from focusing on these transformations through research cases about

the informational basis framing the relationship between safety and work, the article shows how,

beyond labour issues, at stake is the relationship between knowledge and democracy, as the core

moment of the latter, before the political choice is the cognitive one. An effective interaction

between the capability approach and other social science perspectives of research centred on

agency and capacity offers very helpful analytical tools for a critical appraisal and inquiry into these

transformations.

 

Keywords

informational basis, capability, capacity, capacity to aspire, voice, critique, labour, safety

Freiburg Film Forum: Africa / America / Asia / Oceania

Save the Date: 22nd - 28th May 2017

The freiburger film forum has been showing current productions from Africa, the Americas, Asia, and Oceania since 1985, and it continues to make a major contribution to transcultural discourse through its choice of themes. Its workshop atmosphere and moderate size lend the festival a certain intensity and allow for conversations about film that are attractive for directors from all over the world. As an added bonus, the students’ platform also presents the opportunity to view a selection of international debut films by talented directors.

FOCUS USA: AMERICA THE BEAUTIFUL

In cooperation with the Robert Flaherty Film Seminar in New York, the freiburger film forum will be showing a selection of historical and contemporary documentary films that actively engage with social reality in North America. In light of current political developments and the general global shift to the right, the freiburger film forum will be looking at not only the people who are affected, but also different approaches to and models of taking a stand against increasing xenophobia and social injustice.

 

Check out this year's programme: 

https://www.freiburger-filmforum.de/en/

Guest Lecture 26.01.2017

On Thursday, January 26th, at 2pm in ÜR I, KG IV, 5th floor

 
The visiting Brazilian scholar Alexander Englander, who is currently writing his PhD under the supervision of Prof. Manuela Boatca, will speak on "The Brazil as periferic modernity: politics and society in dependent capitalism".

Global Cinema - Großes Globales Kino

Free movie screening organized by the current GSP-batch

 
Join us this thurday at 8pm in our beloved media room (building KG 4, Rempartstraße 15, 5th floor) for a memorable evening of film and discussions - with snacks and drinks (BYO), friends and love. Be there, especially if we haven't seen you in yonks, if we just met you the other day or if we haven't met you at all. 

This weeks movie - XXY: Alex was born with both male and female sex organs. Although "reassignment" surgery was considered after birth, she has lived as a woman until the age of 15, when "XXY" takes up the story. She uses hormones to subdue her male characteristics, but now she has become unsure how she really feels. Alex is neither a man in a woman's body, nor a woman in a man's body, but both, in the body of a high-spirited tomboy who broods privately in uncertainty and confusion.

San Francisco Chronicle: "As finely crafted as a great work of literature."

Chicago Sun-Times: "The shots are beautifully composed, the editing paces the process of self-discovery, the dialogue is spare and heartfelt, the performances are deeply human -- especially by Efron."

Washington Post: "XXY is, in the best possible sense of the word, an awkward film."

Guest Lecture: V. Sujatha, JNU New Delhi

13. December 2016, 6.00 - 8.00pm, Room 1019 KG I

The antinomies of economic growth and public health -

Econometric and sociological conceptions of food and nutrition

Abstract:
The assessment of nutritional status of populations has always been a quantitative exercise that facilitates macro analysis, comparisons and policy interventions. The mainstream discourses on nutrition are based on the caloric conception of food as a biochemical substance. While this enables measurement, assessment and the provision of formulaic foods for the malnourished, it has its own limits. The biochemical and quantitative conception of food is most conducive to capital investment and industrial production of food that may not be healthy. Popular perceptions of food among communities and neighbourhoods indicate that there is a complicated dynamics between culture, cost and cuisine that cannot be grased by exclusive quantitative approaches. Drawing on field data from ongoing research in South India and South Africa, this working paper highlights the methodological and substantive issues in transposing statistical averages on existential realities of food and eating.

We have the pleasure to announce this guest lecture by Professor V. Sujatha, head of the Centre for the Studies of Social Systems at the GSP-partner Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi.
V. Sujatha's field of specialisation is the Sociology of knowledge and the Sociology of health and medicine with particular reference to traditional systems of medicine.

Colloquium politicum: Spotlight Southeast Asia

A guest lecture series on current developments in Indonesia and the South China Sea

 

Donnerstag / 3. November 2016 / 20 Uhr c.t. /HS 1015, KG I

Dr. Dirk Tomsa (Senior Lecturer, Department of Politics and Philosophy, La Trobe University, Melbourne)

"Indonesia under Presidend Jokowi - Domestic and Foreign Policy challenges for an Aspiring Regional Power"

 

Montag / 7. November 2016 / 18 Uhr c.t. / HS 1015, KG I

Anita Prakash (Director General, Policy Department, Economic Research Institute for ASEAN and East Asia (ERIA))

"Political Realism and Economic Outlook in ASEAN and East Asia"

 

 Organized in cooperation with the Institute of International Politics, South East Asian Studies Programme Freiburg, Landeszentrale für politische Bildung Freiburg and the Carl-Schurz-Haus

More detailed information about this lecture series can be found here: https://www.studiumgenerale.uni-freiburg.de/col-politicum/vortragsreihen/spotlight-suedostasien 

Guest Lectures June/July 2016

 

On Thursday, June 30, at 6pm, Dr. Anca Parvulescu (Washington University St. Louis, USA) will speak on

„East European Women‘s Migration, Racial Triangulation and the Making of Europe“

in ÜR 1, KG IV, 5th floor.

Her lecture is based on her book „The Traffic in Women‘s Work: East European Migration and the Making of Europe“ (University of Chicago Press, 2014). The book is an intervention in the heated debate on the making and unmaking of Europe in the wake of 1989. It argues that the critical project of pluralizing Europe needs to account for the Europe brought together through the traffic in East European women. Reading recent cinematic texts that critically frame the traffic in women, the book shows that, in today’s Europe, East European migrant women are “exchanged” so they can engage in labor traditionally performed by wives within the institution of marriage. East European migrant women, alongside women from the global South, become responsible for the biopolitical labor of reproduction, whether they work as domestics, nannies, nurses, sex workers, or wives.

 

On Wednesday, July 6, at 4pm, Prof. Vilna Bashi Treitler (CUNY Graduate Center, USA) will give a talk entitled

"White Supremacy & Ethnic Projects: How & Why Racism Survives & Thrives"

in the media room, KG IV, 5th floor.

The talk will draw from and also go beyond the theses in her latest book, "The Ethnic Project. Transforming Racial Fiction into Ethnic Factions" (Stanford University Press, 2013), as well as the work on our co-edited monograph issue of Current Sociology, "Dynamics of Inequalities in a Global Perspective" (March 2016).

 

On Friday, July 8, at 6pm, Prof. Roberto Patricio Korzeniewicz (University of Maryland, USA) will speak on

"Global Elites in Historical Perspective"

in ÜR 1, KG IV, 5th floor.

The talk builds on the research Prof. Korzeniewicz has undertaken in the past ten years on inequality, migration, and economic elites in the capitalist world-system. You can find an interview with Prof. Korzeniewicz detailing his biographical background, his methodological approach, and some advice for graduate students here:
http://umdsocy.blogspot.de/2009/09/interview-with-roberto-patricio.html

The two latter talks are part of the GSP classes "Dynamics of Inequalities in a Global Perspective" and "The Haves and the Have-Mores", so students should take advantage of the opportunity to meet the authors whose works we've read this semester and ask their most pressing questions. Beyond their role in the classes, our two guests are prominent inequality researchers and experts in their field, which is why the talks are public - you are all very welcome to attend and spread the word!

New Global Studies Website!

New Global Studies Website!

New Book: Alejandro Pelfini & Gastón Fulquet

The role of the „brics“ in the construction of multipolarity

Reform or Adaptation?


Alejandro Pelfini. Gastón Fulquet. [Publisher]

Karen Smith. Carlos R. S. Milani. Valentina Delich. Jorge Marchini. Gladys Lechini. Ana María Vara. Daniel García Delgado. Alejandro Pelfini. [Authors of the individual chapters]


....................................................................................
Sur-Sur.
ISBN 978-987-722-138-1
CLACSO. CODESRIA. IDEAs. FLACSO-Argentina.
Buenos Aires.

November 2015

 


 

This book aims at gathering a critical mass of experts to debate and rethink the concepts and labels of development of the last years and to evaluate its normative power. To act on the assumption that some categories, like the one of the emergent markets/powers/societies, the „BRICS“, „soft powers“ and „Cooperation South South“, can be put in a new and more realistic perspective – if one not only looks at them from the point of view of global governance, but also from the point of view of the region of the South Atlantic – in the conference we sought to analyze synergies between countries with great similarities like South Africa, Brasil and Argentina.

The book is written in Spanish.

Further information about the book on CLACSO - Libros.

DFG-Programme: Minor Cosmopolitanisms

16 new DFG-Programmes: One new post graduate programme is „Minor Cosmopolitanisms“.

The concept of “cosmopolitanism” brings to mind ideas of world travel, polyglotism and the simultaneous attachment to multiple places, as well as notions of hospitality, human rights and the love of mankind. Apart from such generalization however, there has never been much agreement about what exactly is to be counted as “cosmopolitan”.

The graduate programme will focus on a range of ‘discrepant’ forms of cosmopolitan citizenship and belonging that have been the reality for colonial subjects in the past and have become the contemporary reality for millions of migrants as well as Indigenous people around the globe.

 

Further information on DFG Service or "Minor Cosmopolitanisms" summer school in Potsdam.

FLACSO Argentina: Hermann Schwengel Chair in Theories of Globalization

In memory of Hermann Schwengel one of the programme's creators, who passed away on December 7th 2014, the Seminar "Theories of Globalization" at FLACSO Argentina became the "Hermann Schwengel Chair in Theories of Globalization". The Seminar "Theories of Globalization" or rather "Hermann Schwengel Chair in Theories of Globalization" is annually thought as part of the Global Studies Programme second semester at FLACSO Argentina.

Further information on the "Hermann Schwengel Chair in Theories of Globalization" at FLACSO Argentina.

 

2016 Application Form now available

The new application form is available, in order to apply for the Global Studies Programme starting April 1st 2016. The Deadline to apply for the Programme is November 30th 2015.

You find all needed information and the application form here [...].

Obituary of Hermann Schwengel (1949 – 2014)

Hermann Schwengel was born in 1949 in the rural area Rahden-Wehe near Minden in North Rhine-Westphalia. From 1971 on, he studied Philosophy, Politics and Education in Konstanz, Marburg and Zurich. In 1979 he received a Doctor of Philosophy for his work on the structural revision of Marxist social theory. In 1979 Schwengel followed his doctorate supervisor Dietmar Kamper to work as his assistant at  Freie Universität in Berlin. He spent two years at City University in New York writing his habilitation dissertation about the dispersing US-American and European paths of Modernization, followed by a research stay at Lancaster University as a Humboldt Fellow. From 1990 to 1993, Schwengel worked at Freie Universität before he eventually took up the professorship for Sociology at Albert-Ludwigs-Universität as successor to  Heinrich Popitz in 1994.

Prof. Schwengel was able to integrate  his philosophical orientation in disputes of grand theory as well as his interest in historical sociology and in cultural sociology into Freiburg’s Institute for Sociology. His views on  political sociology, which centered on  the future of modern societies, greatly contributed to the Institute and  also managed to advance the view of a sociology consisting of global linkages. This became the center of his research and teaching. Schwengel’s objectives were outlined in his programmatic work “Globalization with a European Face” and led to the founding of the interdisciplinary Master program Social Sciences (Global Studies Programme) a few years later. This program with cooperation partners in India, South Africa, Argentina and Bangkok started in 2002 and quickly developed into an award-winning and successful program, contributing significantly to the international visibility of Albert-Ludwigs-Universität.

Schwengel’s sphere of influence was not just limited to the University of Freiburg. The founding and operation of the Global Studies Programme required regular trips to Africa, Asia and Latin America, an undertaking that Schwengel was more than willing to make. In addition to his contributions to the Global Studies Programme, he was a lecturer at the Collège d’Europe in Bruges, a member of the commission for fundamental values of the Social Democratic Party in Germany, a consultant for the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) and a member of editorial boards for numerous journals.

A highlight of Schwengel’s career at the Institute for Sociology was the organization of the trinational congress ‘A borderless Society’, which took place in Freiburg in 1998 and brought together German, Austrian and Swiss associations for Sociology. Apart from the leadership at the Institute, he was very active in academic affairs at the University of Freiburg. He served as a member of the senate from 1997 to 1999, as the founding dean of the restructured Philosophical Faculty from 2002 until 2006 and the Vice-Rector for research from 2009 to 2012.

He became severely ill shortly after his retirement in emeritus status at the end of September and passed away on December 7th. The Institute for Sociology, the Philosophical Faculty and Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg has lost a renowned and committed personality, an inspiring academic teacher and a highly esteemed colleague. Hermann Schwengel was both an innovator in his field and an academic professional capable of  implementing ideas. His intellectual acumen and his  optimistic spirit will be truly missed. We at the Institute, will do our utmost to  honor his memory. Our deepest sympathy and condolences go out to his family.

Ulrich Bröckling